Rosamund Pike


Date of Birth
28 January 1979, London, England, UK
Birth Name
Rosamund Mary Elizabeth Pike
Nickname
Ros
Height
5' 9" (1.75 m)
Trivia
Plays the piano and cello.
Can also speak French and German.
Went to school in Bristol, England, UK.
Graduated with a 2:1 (upper second class degree = 2nd Honors = Magna Cum Laude) in English Literature from Oxford University's Wadham College.
Went to the same school as famous Irish writer Iris Murdoch.
An only child, her parents are Julian and Caroline Pike. Julian is a professional opera singer, whilst Caroline is a concert violinist.
She was friends with Chelsea Clinton while at Wadham College, Oxford. Not only are they both the same height (5' 9"), they are both fluent in German, and they are both only children.
Won the Award for Best Debut at the 2003 Empire Awards for her performance as Miranda Frost in Die Another Day (2002).
The age difference between herself and Halle Berry in Die Another Day (2002) - 12 years and 5 months - is the greatest age difference between two Bond girls in one film since Alison Doody and Grace Jones - a difference of 18 years - in Perspectiva unei crime (1985).
Was engaged to Joe Wright, having met when he directed her on the set of Pride & Prejudice (2005), after he proposed to her on Lake Como in Italy (September 2007-June 2008).
Beat out Saffron Burrows, Alicia Silverstone and Sophie Ellis-Bextor for her role in Die Another Day (2002).
Was in a relationship with Robie Uniacke (November 2009-August 2010).
Personal Quotes
Filming Pride & Prejudice (2005) was a joy and made for one of my happiest summers ever. "It could well be that the story brings out the best in people - and it sounds so cheesy, but we really did behave like a family. The girls playing the younger sisters had never been on a film set before and wanted to socialize all the time, so we picnicked, hung out in a beautiful country house and went swimming naked in a lake. It was idyllic.
I don't think RADA wanted me, actually. When I was at Oxford I had a boyfriend at Central [School of Speech and Drama] and it looked like the most fantastic life, but I think not going makes you more free. Nothing can teach you what it's like to work on a film set, and the best education there can be for an actor is to walk up the street and observe human nature.
When you're dressed up like Miranda Frost [from Die Another Day (2002)], people assume you have a similar character, but I was 21 and quaking inside.
I think you can make a choice with that kind of thing. You can certainly keep a low public profile if you want to. Ideally, I'd like to be living in upstate New York, in a house that I could renovate and fill with books and clothes, while being offered the kind of parts that are currently going to Kate Winslet and Nicole Kidman.
I think it's OK to play to your strengths, and if I have a quality of Englishness that people like, I won't hide that. I'm probably not going to play a junkie and that's OK because there are other people who will do it better. A view that's been held for a long time is that the best way to prove oneself as an actor is to play the grittiest roles out there. I don't agree with that.
I'd love to say I was the kind of person who has an outline. But the only outline I have is that I want to carry on doing this all my life.
[On the direction from Joe Wright in "Pride and Prejudice."] You can get quite self-conscious at times, there's this business of your close up coming up, but in that big ball scene he put three cameras on it. And in lots of the dinner scenes too, so you wouldn't actually know when your moment was coming. That's why it's got that lovely unaware quality to it, you really did feel it's being observed. I think it's because people didn't know they were being watched really, that's what you get, this window on life.
Daniel Day-Lewis in "In the Name of the Father" was the first performance that made me think about how incredible acting is. It made me realise the power of film and that this medium could have a physical reaction on me and I hadn't really experienced that before. I come from a theatrical family and grew up around stage, so film-going was not really part of my life. But I remember going to see this film and being riveted by the story and the performances. I found it sexy and believable; it took me into another world. I was in floods of tears at the end of it.